Flying during pregnancy

Are you considering flying during your pregnancy? Would you like to know more about flying when you’re pregnant? In the following we have collected all of the important information that you need to know if you are going to fly while expecting a child.

 

 

Flying while expecting a child

As an expectant mother, you can fly up to the 36th week of your pregnancy – that also applies for the return flight. TUI fly does not transport women who are more than 36 weeks pregnant because the risk of complications is too high. The airline company might request that you present the medical documentation regarding your pregnancy (known in Germany as a “Mutterpass”). As a pregnant woman, you alone are responsible for knowing if you are healthy enough to fly. For this reason, we recommend that you consult with a physician in advance, if necessary. If you have already booked a round trip flight and the return flight is scheduled in the period following the 36th week of pregnancy, TUI fly can already deny your transportation on the outgoing flight.

If you are expecting more than one child, flying is often prohibited starting in the 32nd week of the pregnancy. For this reason, you should definitely seek information regarding the respective airline regulations in a timely manner and carry the certificate issued by your gynaecologist as well as related medical documentation (“Mutterpass”) with you in your carry-on baggage.

Airline regulations

Of course, the condition of your health as an expectant mother is important for making decisions about flying – nevertheless, the regulations of the specific airlines should likewise be taken into account. Not every airline will transport a pregnant woman at any time during her pregnancy. According to the International Air Transport Association (IATA), airlines should only transport expectant mothers after the 36th week of pregnancy if a physician has confirmed that she is fit to fly and has issued a certificate in that regard.

If you are expecting more than one child, flying is often prohibited starting in the 32nd week of the pregnancy. For this reason, you should definitely seek information regarding the respective airline regulations in a timely manner and carry the certificate issued by your gynaecologist as well as related medical documentation (“Mutterpass”) with you in your carry-on baggage.

Entry requirements for expectant mothers

Some countries have special entry requirements that often represent difficulties for pregnant women who are travelling. For example, the USA: If your child were born during your stay in the USA, your new-born infant would automatically receive United States citizenship. If you are planning to fly to Singapore, as early as the 6th week of your pregnancy you need a physician’s certificate and what is called a Social Visit Pass – you can apply for this pass at the respective embassy. There are quite a few more special entry requirements, so TUI fly recommends that you inform yourself before your flight about the regulations of the country to which you are travelling.

When should pregnant women not fly?

From a medical perspective, there are just a few health effects for pregnant women with regard to flying: Still, we at TUI fly would like to inform you about a few situations – as a pregnant woman, you should not fly if...

  • You are undergoing a high-risk pregnancy
  • If placenta praevia has been confirmed (placenta is attached near the cervical opening)
  • You have significant heart and circulatory problems
  • You have a risk of thrombosis
  • You have a significant fear of flying
  • The probability of a premature birth is very high

Tips for expectant mothers before and during the flight

  • Take advantage of travel cancellation and travel health insurance. But be careful: Many insurance companies do not refund costs incurred abroad due to problems during pregnancy or birth!
  • Inform yourself early on about the special conditions of the respective airline and about the corresponding entry requirements.
  • Inform yourself in a timely manner about medical/physician’s care at your travel destination.
  • Take a first-aid kit with you that includes everything you need in case of an emergency.
  • Always have your the medical documentation regarding your pregnancy with you; and it’s best to have an additional copy as well.
  • Make sure to stay hydrated during the flight.
  • Book a seat on the aisle or in the front row so that you have enough leg room.
  • Wear comfortable, loose clothing for the flight – make yourself at home!
  • Do not remain seated for the entire flight – walk up and down the aisle every so often, keep moving.
  • Store your carry-on baggage in the baggage compartment so as not to limit your leg room.
  • It’s best to fasten your seat belt below your belly.

Note: The above regulations apply only to air carriage by TUI fly. Different regulations may apply when flying with animals on flights with other airlines. The particular regulations and fees confirmed by the respective air carrier apply to those flights.

In general, it is only permitted to transport batteries and electric battery-powered devices if they are undamaged and not otherwise defective and are not subject to a product recall.

Furthermore, all batteries must meet the requirements of the UN Manual of Tests and Criteria, Part III, Subsection 38.3. Proof must be provided at the time of reservation or check-in at the airport, e.g. by means of a certificate from the manufacturer.


 

Further information can be found in the conditions of carriage of the respective airline. These can be different.

 


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